What’s Happening at Glen Aulin – Tuolumne River Plan

White Cascade near Glen Aulin

White Cascade near Glen Aulin

The Preferred Alternative of the Tuolumne River Plan calls for removal of about 38% of the popular lodging at Glen Aulin High Sierra Camp, from 32 beds down to 20 beds. The reduction is an attempt to bring the camp into better alignment with the septic system capacity.

Yosemite’s High Sierra Camps (HSC) give people an opportunity to enjoy the backcountry without having to carry a large pack. The Glen Aulin HSC is located along the Tuolumne River, and is situated next to the pool below 80 foot high White Fall, and visitors enjoy watching the sun set from a nearby promontory with a view of Mt. Conness. A popular day trip continues from Glen Aulin down the Tuolumne River to see Waterwheel Falls.

All of the proposed alternatives address the issue of wastewater disposal, and replacing the composting toilet at the backpacker campground near Glen Aulin. Other alternatives propose changes ranging from closing Glen Aulin HSC completely (Alternative 1), to converting the HSC to a seasonal outfitter camp with no permanent structures except for a composting toilet (Alternative 2). Alternative 3 would continue to restrict water usage to 600 gals/day, while the preferred alternative reduces the allowable usage to 500 gallons.

Other changes to the High Sierra Camps, such as the Merced Lake HSC, can be found in the Draft Merced River Plan.

There are also numerous other changes being proposed in the TRP, including changes to parking, location of the visitor’s center, and day-trip mule and horseback rides. What do you like and dislike about these proposed plans? For more information visit the NPS website, and be sure to comment. We’d love to hear them here, but to be part of the official process, submit your comments via one of the following channels.

Email:

yose_planning@nps.gov

Phone:

209-379-1110

U.S. mail:

Superintendent,
Yosemite National Park,
Attn: Tuolumne River Plan,
P.O. Box 577,
Yosemite, CA 95389

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Does Ice Skating Belong in Yosemite?

Enjoying the Curry Village Ice Rink

Enjoying the Curry Village Ice Rink

Ice skating in Yosemite has been around since the 1920s, and was even part of an unsuccessful bid to host the 1932 Olympics. Thousands of people enjoy circling the ice in the winter with views of Glacier Point and Half Dome. Journalists have listed it as one of the world’s best ice rinks.

As part of the Merced River Planning process, the US Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals directed the National Park Service to consider all commercial services within Yosemite Valley and eliminate services that are not essential to the Yosemite experience. In all but the No Action alternative (Alternatives 2 – 6), the ice rink is earmarked for removal.

What do you think?

Submit a comment to the National Park Service. The comment period is open until April 18, 2013. Your comments matter. Public input has strongly helped to shape the draft plan, and it’s important for everyone to continue to provide feedback for the next phase as planners develop a final plan. Learn more about the Merced River Plan.

Yosemite Parking under the MRP

A Range of Alternatives for the Merced River Plan

A Range of Alternatives for the Merced River Plan

On peak days in Yosemite Valley, traffic and parking can be a challenge. The Merced River Plan outlines a few options to improve parking and traffic flow to give people a better experience when they visit.
Under Preferred Alternative 5, the National Park Service proposes many strategies including:

  • Increase day-use parking spaces in Yosemite Valley (+5%).
  • Improve traffic circulation by building underpasses and roundabouts in key locations like day-use parking and across from Yosemite Lodge at the Falls.
  • Accommodate approximately 19,900 visitors per day in East Yosemite Valley, compared to current peak visitation of about 20,900.
  • Continue to manage overnight-use capacity through wilderness permits and reservation systems for lodging and camping.
  • Manage day-use capacity for East Yosemite Valley through traffic diversions and monitoring.
  • Create an additional parking area in the west end of Yosemite Valley to accommodate overflow traffic.
  • Provide additional public transit and free shuttle bus services, with routes extending further west to include locations like Bridalveil and the new proposed parking area.

What do you think?

Submit a comment to the National Park Service. The comment period is open until April 18, 2013. Your comments matter. Public input has strongly helped to shape the draft plan, and it’s important for everyone to continue to provide feedback for the next phase as planners develop a final plan. Learn more about the Merced River Plan.

Yosemite Concessionaire Receives 2012 Mariposa County Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year Award

Representatives of DNC accepted the 2012 Business of the Year Award

Representatives of DNC accepted the 2012 Business of the Year Award

On January 24, a group of Delaware North Companies (DNC) Parks & Resorts at Yosemite employees traveled to the Mariposa County Fairgrounds to accept the 2012 “Business of the Year” Award from the Mariposa County Chamber of Commerce. The western-themed awards dinner recognized individuals and organizations that made a big impact on the community of Mariposa in the past year.

DNC was specially recognized for the following efforts:

  • Offering employment opportunities to those who lost their jobs due to the fire at the Pizza Factory in May 2012
  • Dedication to local, sustainable and healthy food options in Yosemite
  • Recycling program: In the past 10 years, DNC has recycled 6,946 tons of material and another 8,517 tons of material has been diverted from landfills through composting and reuse. In 2010, DNC collected 250 tons of organic waste and over 300 tons in 2011
  • GreenPath® – DNC’s award-winning environmental management system that was ISO certified in 2001
  • Professional and caring way DNC reacted to difficult situations

“It is an honor to be recognized by the Mariposa County Chamber of Commerce as Business of the Year,” said DNC Parks & Resorts at Yosemite President Dan Jensen. “Part of our core mission is to provide stewardship and hospitality in special places, and this award is an honor and tribute to our dedicated associates for providing memorable Yosemite experiences for millions of visitors each year.”

The Mariposa County Chamber of Commerce also recognized Ron Iudice from the California Mining and Mineral Museum as Businessman of the Year. Karen Cutter of Ladybug Embroidery was named Businesswoman of the Year and the organization, SCOPE (Sheriff’s Community-Organized Policing Effort) was recognized as Volunteer of the Year for all of their service, from managing parade-day traffic to family safety programs.